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20121201
20121231
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KPIX (CBS) 2
WUSA (CBS) 1
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Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)
CBS
Dec 2, 2012 7:00pm PST
. unlike shin, park had seen the outside world. he'd lived in pyongyang and traveled in china, and he began to tell shin what life was like on the other side of the fence. >> shin: i paid most attention to what kind of food he ate outside the camp. >> cooper: what kind of food had he eaten? >> shin: oh, a lot of different things-- broiled chicken, barbecued pig. the most important thing was the thought that even a prisoner like me could eat chicken and pork if i were able to escape the barbed wires. >> cooper: i've heard people define freedom in many ways. i've never heard someone define it as broiled chicken. >> shin: i still think of freedom in that way. >> cooper: really? that's what freedom means to you? >> shin: people can eat what they want. it could be the greatest gift from god. >> cooper: you were ready to die just to get a good meal? >> shin: yes. >> cooper: he got his chance in january 2005, when he says he and park were gathering firewood in this remote area near the electrified fence. as the sun began to set, they decided to make a run for it. >> harden: and as they ran towards
CBS
Dec 9, 2012 7:00pm PST
, rare collectors items, and pets. how big a business is the turtle-tortoise trade? >> goode: china alone is probably in the hundreds of millions of dollars. this trade flourishes because the payoff is huge and the chance of getting prosecuted and incarcerated are very low. >> stahl: if you're going to be in something illicit, this is the safest or one of the safest. >> goode: and that's a tragedy. >> stahl: eric goode is spending a million dollars a year of his own money to fight the trade in places like madagascar, an island off the coast of africa, that's vastly undeveloped. >> goode: people are so poor, some of these villages make less than a dollar a day, or it's basically subsistence living. and there just simply isn't the political will of the country to really enforce, you know, what's going on with their natural heritage, whether it's tortoises or other wildlife. >> stahl: fly over madagascar and you can see why conservationists say it's bleeding to death-- rivers run red with soil erosion from logging and slash-and-burn agriculture that have wiped out animal habitats and 90% of
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)